Exploring the concept of spirituality III: Pauline and Christian roots

rembrandt_st-_paul_in_prison
St Paul in prison by Rembrandt [Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons]
Margaret Chatterjee’s writings on the concept of spirituality suggests that Christian thinking on what constitutes spirituality emerge from St. Paul’s thoughts on the matter. If one goes by biblical records, Jesus himself spoke about the Spirit of God less than a dozen times while Paul mentions the spirit over a hundred times.

Jesus did recognize the importance of the body, evident when he healed the sick and fed the hungry. He did not present any apparent dichotomy between the spirit and the flesh but he was certainly concerned with the dichotomy between the present human state and the future of the Kingdom of God that was to come. In other words, there was a contrast between the things of the spirit and mortality. This awareness, Paul addresses, by assigning a new set of roles to the Spirit. It is the Spirit, he says, which reveals, teaches, inspires, strengthens, sanctifies, infuses love, and “sets us free” (from the travails of mortality?). Continue reading “Exploring the concept of spirituality III: Pauline and Christian roots”

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Awaiting the 4th edition of the STS Handbook

The period after the Second World War saw the recognition of science as a “social problem”. Academics became interested and started exploring the relationship between science, technology and society, which resulted in a new academic field – Science and Technology Studies (STS). This “social” study of science essentially looks at (1) the nature and practices of science and technology, and (2) the impact of science and technology on society (and vice-versa).

Continue reading “Awaiting the 4th edition of the STS Handbook”