Exploring the Concept of Spirituality – I

Religious Buddhism Spirituality Monk Theravada Monk
A Buddhist Theravada monk [Image Courtesy: Max Pixel]
Margaret Chatterjee (born 1925), the philosopher of religion, is known for a number of things. Among the things she is best known for her 1983 Teape Lectures at Cambridge on the “Concept of Spirituality”. The substance of these lectures were published as a scholarly book, among the first to tackle the seemingly simple question: “What is spirituality?”. This is the first in a series of blog posts, summarizing her thoughts on this question – basically summaries of the chapters in the 1987 book written by Chatterjee.

Contemporary literature on spirituality and “inner transformation” is figuring prominently on various bestseller lists – Amazon.com has a separate category on Religion & Spirituality featuring half a million titles! Empirical research into spirituality is no longer considered taboo and even encouraged – visible in the proliferation of scientific articles on spirituality and dedicated research centres in universities. Continue reading “Exploring the Concept of Spirituality – I”

Galileo: The heretic who wasn’t

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Galileo facing the Roman Inquisition (Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

Students venturing into the social studies of science will quickly realize that the origins of modern science cannot be studied without understanding the role that organized religion played in its development. Indeed, there has been a legacy where historians of science have overplayed the hypothesis that science and religion are fundamentally opposed to each other. The condemnation of Galileo Galilei by the Inquisition of the Roman Catholic Church in 1633 is widely presented as the paradigmatic case of the interminable conflict between science and religion. However, the study of Galileo’s life, work, and his trial requires more than the simplistic thesis of an authoritarian, religious institution silencing a singular, scientific genius.

Continue reading “Galileo: The heretic who wasn’t”