Exploring the concept of spirituality III: Pauline and Christian roots

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St Paul in prison by Rembrandt [Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons]
Margaret Chatterjee’s writings on the concept of spirituality suggests that Christian thinking on what constitutes spirituality emerge from St. Paul’s thoughts on the matter. If one goes by biblical records, Jesus himself spoke about the Spirit of God less than a dozen times while Paul mentions the spirit over a hundred times.

Jesus did recognize the importance of the body, evident when he healed the sick and fed the hungry. He did not present any apparent dichotomy between the spirit and the flesh but he was certainly concerned with the dichotomy between the present human state and the future of the Kingdom of God that was to come. In other words, there was a contrast between the things of the spirit and mortality. This awareness, Paul addresses, by assigning a new set of roles to the Spirit. It is the Spirit, he says, which reveals, teaches, inspires, strengthens, sanctifies, infuses love, and “sets us free” (from the travails of mortality?). Continue reading “Exploring the concept of spirituality III: Pauline and Christian roots”

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Exploring the concept of spirituality II: Roots in Judaism

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Moses & the burning bush – 1920 Painting by Gebhard Fugel [Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons]
As we saw previously, understanding the concept of spirituality requires a journey into exploring how the idea of the spirit developed historically, as Margaret Chatterjee suggests in her book, The Concept of Spirituality.

 

If we consider the starting point of what we call today “spirit”, (early) Judaism talks about the term Nephesh in the Hebrew Bible. Nephesh is considered the source of human vitality; it is nephesh which concretely defines the human as a being possessing life, which is a gift of God. Since Jews (and Christians among others) believe that it was God who gave them life (nephesh) and it was God who created the world, the Jews did not see any need to question the sanctity of the materialistic world or to withdraw from a problematic world (as opposed to what prominent gurus suggest today). Continue reading “Exploring the concept of spirituality II: Roots in Judaism”

Exploring the Concept of Spirituality – I

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A Buddhist Theravada monk [Image Courtesy: Max Pixel]
Margaret Chatterjee (born 1925), the philosopher of religion, is known for a number of things. Among the things she is best known for her 1983 Teape Lectures at Cambridge on the “Concept of Spirituality”. The substance of these lectures were published as a scholarly book, among the first to tackle the seemingly simple question: “What is spirituality?”. This is the first in a series of blog posts, summarizing her thoughts on this question – basically summaries of the chapters in the 1987 book written by Chatterjee.

Contemporary literature on spirituality and “inner transformation” is figuring prominently on various bestseller lists – Amazon.com has a separate category on Religion & Spirituality featuring half a million titles! Empirical research into spirituality is no longer considered taboo and even encouraged – visible in the proliferation of scientific articles on spirituality and dedicated research centres in universities. Continue reading “Exploring the Concept of Spirituality – I”

Decoding the science agenda of the liberal Pope and his conservative flock

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Pope Francis and Leonardo DiCaprio [Image Courtesy: Catholic Herald]
When the Academy Award winning actor Leonardo DiCaprio used his 2016 award acceptance speech to say that “climate change is real“, his stand was celebrated by the liberal media. But it may not come as a huge surprise considering that Hollywood A-listers like DiCaprio are generally liberal and have championed the cause of the marginalized – both people and planet. However, when another “celebrity” on (shall we say) the other end of the political spectrum, made a similar advocacy attempt by writing a letter – it created global fanfare among the climate change mitigation advocates.

Pope Francis’ papal encyclical Laudato Si was released in June 2015. Having the subtitle “On Care for Our Common Home”, the encyclical urged the global community (not just members of the Catholic Church) to act on an urgent basis and tackle the problem of climate change. Laudato Si is not the first papal document to address issues concerning earth and the environment. But it was perhaps the first attempt to increase action among “conservatives in general and Catholic conservatives in particular”. Continue reading “Decoding the science agenda of the liberal Pope and his conservative flock”

Science, truth and modesty

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The Martian film poster [Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons]
Mark Watney, the character played by Matt Damon in the 2015 Hollywood blockbuster The Martian is stranded all alone on Mars. But he announces defiantly that the only way he can survive and return to Earth is to “science the shit out of this!” This quote came as music to the ears of scientists worldwide, and all those who saw science as the all-redeeming vehicle for seeking truth, and the sole authority to make life better for us earthlings has generally been assumed by the larger public. But is it really so?

To begin with, what we accept as science is what is published in academic journals after experimentation and after scrutiny by expert reviewers. But recent evidence points out that several experiments published in reputed journals are not always replicable – meaning they do not yield the same results when the experiment is performed again. In other words, the science behind the experiments may not be reliable or worse, fake. Continue reading “Science, truth and modesty”